Archive for the 'Art' Category

Like Ice In The Sunshine

Following a weekend of beautiful Summer-esque weather that has actually continued into Monday I’m beginning to believe that Summer is well on its way.

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What better way to celebrate than to feature Simone Rosenbauer’s deliciously simple Like Ice In The Sunshine series which takes an artistic look at slowly melting ice lollies set against a complimentary block colour background.

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Inspired by melting “bodies of different shapes and sizes” whilst sunbathing on Bondi Beach, Simone has captured that essence and translated it into something that everybody loves.  The saturated colours of the ice lollies so reminiscent of childhood summer holidays and the inevitable dripping and melting as the sun beats you to eating them.

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Nothing says summer like a Twister melting all over your shorts.

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Check out more of Simone’s work here.

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Art Of The Brick

Last weekend I managed to get myself along to the penultimate day of the Art of the Brick exhibition showcasing the works of Lego artist Nathan Sawaya.

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It’s something we (me, the wife, and the little one) have been meaning to go to for ages and we finally got ourselves (pushchair and all!) up to the Truman Galleries off Brick Lane to see the Lego works in all their glory!

Dreams are built… one brick at a time

The whole exhibition is superb and there are far more pieces than I had imagined that there would be.

Although it seems like there’s a lot of photos here, I could have put up so many more.  This is really just a glimpse of some of my favourite pieces from the exhibition.

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The ceiling of the Sistene Chapel

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Michelangelo’s David

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Venus de Milo

The large sculptures are extremely impressive, it’s hard to believe some of them are even made of Lego.  Nathan also has created a number of 2D pieces which, in many ways, are more remarkable (please excuse the photo quality, there’s only so much you can manage carrying a 4month old!).

Built up using the side of bricks they use colour and tone to convey the image.  Some are recognisable works of art built up in a relief of 2D and 3D to create depth, and others look like artistic patterns only to sync into a visible image when you take a step back.

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The Scream

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Mona Lisa

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The Great Wave off Kanagawa

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close up 3D detail

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The Starry Night

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The exhibition had break out spaces showing videos whiched offered a fascinating insight into how Nathan works.  From developing sketches to often chiselling apart large sections of a sculpture to redo them.  Plus a view of his superbly organised Lego workspsace of which I am completely jealous of!

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Some of the animal sculptures are remarkably lifelike.  Well, not like I thought “woah, there’s a dog in here“, but scaled up from the sort of sizes we play with Lego at home you start to blur the blocky edges and lose the square corners.

Curves and rounded shapes all of a sudden are possible and your eye interprets it as a whole new form.

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Our daughter making friends with the polar bear!

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An infinite knot

Hands are notoriously difficult to draw, I can’t even imagine how many attempts and amendments went into this giant Lego version!

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The integration of technology and humans

The swimmer sculpture was also particularly good.  Lit using a textured gobo projector it mimics the water ripples and, with the model’s reflection in the glass table top, creates a very powerful illusion of swimming.  Lots of people, me included, actually looked under the table and were surprised to see a distinct lack of Lego!

Lego brick swimmer

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Although you weren’t allowed to touch the sculptures (understandably!) there was nothing stopping you from posing with them.

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The resemblance is uncanny!

One of my favourites was the T-Rex skeleton comprising of some 80,000-odd pieces.  Stunning.

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Some clever pieces even needed a particular viewpoint before it became clear what you were looking at.

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The added benefit of attending the exhibition so late in the calendar was that they had added an additional gallery called In Pieces, a wonderfully playful collaboration with Dean West of Lego items hidden in plain sight of some quite brilliant photographic scenes .

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umbrella

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Suspended bricks complete the floating illusion

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CNN said that the exhibition was in the “top ten of must see global exhibitions”, and you can definitely see why.

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One of many tables in the gift shop!

Having just been inspired by approximately 1.5million Lego bricks through the whole show, and a short play in the gift shop, I then headed off to the Lego store to treat myself!

If you ever get the chance to see any of Nathan Sawaya‘s work I highly recommend it!

Paint With Lego

I’m a little late to the party with this one as it first surfaced a couple of weeks ago but, still, what a beautiful animation from Jon Rolph aka @CheesyBricks.

Paint is a superbly executed take on what I can only presume is a Piet Mondrian piece.  Abstract art involving Lego?  Win-win.

 

The Art Of Form

At first glance I thought this was a cool projection mapping scheme on a Ferrari California T, but once I looked into it I realised they actually did it for real, which makes it even cooler!

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The California T is a stunningly beautiful car (in Rosso Corsa please, if you’re offering), and the form and styling was really put through its paces by the artist Fabian Oefner who travelled to Ferrari HQ in Maranello in order to interpret the car “as an art form through his own eyes”.

The concept was fairly simple, once a specific piping sytem had been developed that is.  Inside a 150mph wind tunnel luminescent paints are thrown over the body of the car and blasted with UV spot lights to bring phosphorescent life to the colours.

As the main lights dim and the UV paint glows, the physical lines of the solid car recede and you are left with the overall form and shape created by the paint, a wonderful organic collection of streaking paint.

The result is “an exploration of the essence of the California T”, encapsulating “the pillars of purposeful design and perpetual innovation that are constants in the creation of all of Ferraris”.

No, I’m not entirely sure what all of that means either.  It looks incredible though!

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There is an unseen relationship between an artist, a subject and the canvas. This unspoken alliance and understanding of the subject can only be brought to light when revealed in its proper context.

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It’s the artist, the subject, and the canvas all at once

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For a bit more insight into what went into the project then take a look at the video below.

If that paint job isn’t quite your thing then head over to the Ferrari Configurator to design your own – I’ve just spent a fair bit of time doing exactly that!

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Via Fubiz.

Postcards For Ants

A couple of years ago I undertook my Flickr 366 project – one photo a day for a whole year.  It was more challenging than it sounds, and encouraged me to break away from photography being something I forced myself to do and instead become more observant in my everyday surroundings, noticing angles, frames and content in other ways.

Anyone that undertakes a daily, year-long project (whatever it is) I have respect and appreciation for.  Lorraine Loots has taken this notion of a daily challenge or task and really stepped it up, not just taking a photo, but creating a miniature painting every single day for a year.

The project started on 1st January 2013, but has continued well into 2014 albeit with a slightly different approach.

But then I just started thinking, what if I don’t stop…

It has transitioned from people booking sentimental dates and making suggestions for that date’s painting, to a year of Cape Town themed images that celebrate Lorraine’s home town designation as World Design Capital 2014.

Each one is intricately detailed and rather beautiful, a few of my favourites are below.

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There’s so many to choose from, and the likes of Team Up, Where’s WallyYashica-D, and Malachite Kingfisher all being worthy of a mention too.  Oh, ok, here’s the Kingfisher anyway.

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Many hundreds more can be viewed on her Tumblr, and if you’re quick you might still be able to buy one of the originals.

 

 

 

Visual Trickery

A clever installation by Spanish based designers (fos) that I stumbled across at work forces you to take a closer look at the entrance of vegan restaurant Rayén at Lope de Vega in Madrid.

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At first glance you barely notice the effect, then as your eye lingers it picks up on the 250m of yellow duct tape that is used as visual trickery of light, colour and perspective.

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The installation looks slightly odd from all but one angle.

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Fortunately even that has been marked out for you to get the perfect snap for Instagram.

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Fun, creative work.  More about the designers here.

The Art Of The Hamburger

The hamburger.  One of the finest American exports.  Yet the rest of the world, UK and Europe very much included, are fast becoming culinary powerhouses (just try Ben Mulock‘s Iberico Pork offering at the Opera Tavern if you don’t believe me!) in defining all that is delicious about the humble burger.

Two people pushing the boundaries of what you can do with a burger, and bringing it bang up to date as the fashionable and high-end food of choice, are the French duo of brilliantly crazy designers Thomas and Quentin.

Despite being notoriously elusive they catalogue the creativity of their efforts on the “utterly majestic” Fat & Furious Burger.

Burger - The EndAstro Burger

Burger - BrrrrgeurVampire Burger

Burger - Canicule burgerBurger… ice cream?

Burger - My name is Bun, James Bun007 Burger in gold

Burger - Neil Armstrong BurgerMy favourite, the Neil Armstrong Burger

Burger - Sanglichon burgerHunting Burger

Burger - The BurgivingThanksgiving Burger

Burger - Hawaiian BurgerThe remarkably lifelike Hawaiian Burger

These are just some of my favourites from their ridiculously wonderful and creative masterpieces, many many more over on their blog Fat & Furious Burger.  Go feast your eyes on their feed!


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