Archive for the 'Creative' Category

Google Cardboard Plastic

Google have put a rather amusing spin on their own VR platform Cardboard and it’s excellent.

For all the serious and hard work that they achieve, it’s always good to see their more tongue-in-cheek side that keeps them both appealing and endearing as a brand to people (not to mention a regular feature every year on April Fools Day!).

What’s realer than real?  Probably nothing.  Or maybe something…

Forget virtual reality, this is the first headset for Actual Reality.

Fully immersive, lightweight and waterproof.  What more could you want?

Cardboard Plastic.  Well played, Google.

Evian Babies

They’re back!

After winning our hearts with their swimming, roller skating and dancing, the Evian Babies are back with a new surfing advert Baby Bay.

This recurring Evian campaign must be one of the few relentlessly successful advertising campaigns out there.  The first spot of Water Babies aired nearly 18 years ago, and with only small changes (mainly to the activity that the babies take part in) the campaign is consistently turning out modern and engaging adverts that never fail to make us smile.

Another incredible advert that has been superbly executed, keep up the good work Evian.

Full credit for this goes to BETC, Wanda and Mikros Image.

More information (and some brilliant t-shirts!) over at babybay.evian.com.

Shadowplay Clock

As clocks go you’d be hard pushed to find one that is more minimal than the Shadowplay Clock by design studio Breaded Escalope.

No numbers, no hands, no way of even telling the time.

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Until, that is, you step up to interact with it.

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A plywood ring conceals 12 LEDs and sensors connected to an Arduino, an open-source, sensor-driven electronics platform, which turns off all but three of the LEDs when it detects your finger.

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Your finger casts shadows from the three LEDs that remain on to create the traditional clock “hands” that we are used to.

The hour and minute “hands” are much darker than the faint shadow of the second “hand” to minimise confusion in what the time is.

Now, if only they could make that power cord a bit more discrete I’d definitely be looking to get one!

Protopiper

In most sectors of the design industry mock-ups are commonplace.  They allow in situ testing of colours, materials, spacial reasoning, lighting effects, usability and so forth in a scale simulation of the final design with an opportunity for feedback to iterate and refine the design.

Although worthwhile, they can often be expensive and time consuming for the overall project.  Cue the Protopiper.

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Created by a team at the HPI Human Computer Interaction Lab in Germany, the device acts as a mini handheld assembly line.  It draws tape from a roll, shapes it into a tube, seals it, and cuts it off with a wing connector allowing you to join endless pieces together.

Innovation sometimes sits between AutoCAD and balloon animals.

What might have easily have started out as a joke down the pub is actually a very cleverly detailed piece of kit.

It allows for very quick and very cost effective mock-ups of, well, almost anything that you can think of!  Being able to “air sketch” 1:1 scale objects in real space would be an invaluable tool for many architects, interior designers, space planners, and designers in general.

It’s like wireframing in real life.

Ok, so it’s not 100% perfect.  But it does have appeal with an almost whimsical and crafty element to how it looks and performs (as a hacked tape dispenser) that can effectively draw and build ideas in real time.  It’s not always about being perfect but often more getting a feel for something, which the Protopiper achieves rather well.

Read the published paper Protopiper: Physically Sketching Room-Sized Objects at Actual Scale here.

Via Fast Co.

Laser Cut Lexus

Laser cutting has been around for a while as a manufacturing technique for a range of materials, but I’m not sure I’ve seen anything as impressive as this created using that method. Especially out of cardboard!

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With a somewhat tongue-in-cheek approach on the quest for the ultimate eco-friendly car Lexus have produced 1,700 sheets of intricately laser-cut cardboard.

The resulting model is a 1:1 scale version their new IS model as a “celebration of the human craftsmanship skills that go into every car they make”.

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The model was produced in the UK by Laser Cut Works and Scales & Models who converted a 3D computer model into numbered cardboard slices and then assembled the entire model by hand.  The glue used for each 10mm layer took 10 minutes to set after every application.  That’s a lot of time waiting for glue to dry!

Turning a mundane material into a beautiful sculpture

Oh, and did I mention the car actually works too! Well, sort of.  There are actual working doors, a working steering wheel, and with the help of a concealed steel frame the model can actually be “driven” with an electric motor.

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The level of detail is extremely impressive, from the cup holders in the centre console to the interior air vents.

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Amazing stuff!  Watch the making of it here.

Via designboom.

Art Of The Brick

Last weekend I managed to get myself along to the penultimate day of the Art of the Brick exhibition showcasing the works of Lego artist Nathan Sawaya.

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It’s something we (me, the wife, and the little one) have been meaning to go to for ages and we finally got ourselves (pushchair and all!) up to the Truman Galleries off Brick Lane to see the Lego works in all their glory!

Dreams are built… one brick at a time

The whole exhibition is superb and there are far more pieces than I had imagined that there would be.

Although it seems like there’s a lot of photos here, I could have put up so many more.  This is really just a glimpse of some of my favourite pieces from the exhibition.

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The ceiling of the Sistene Chapel

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Michelangelo’s David

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Venus de Milo

The large sculptures are extremely impressive, it’s hard to believe some of them are even made of Lego.  Nathan also has created a number of 2D pieces which, in many ways, are more remarkable (please excuse the photo quality, there’s only so much you can manage carrying a 4month old!).

Built up using the side of bricks they use colour and tone to convey the image.  Some are recognisable works of art built up in a relief of 2D and 3D to create depth, and others look like artistic patterns only to sync into a visible image when you take a step back.

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The Scream

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Mona Lisa

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The Great Wave off Kanagawa

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close up 3D detail

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The Starry Night

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The exhibition had break out spaces showing videos whiched offered a fascinating insight into how Nathan works.  From developing sketches to often chiselling apart large sections of a sculpture to redo them.  Plus a view of his superbly organised Lego workspsace of which I am completely jealous of!

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Some of the animal sculptures are remarkably lifelike.  Well, not like I thought “woah, there’s a dog in here“, but scaled up from the sort of sizes we play with Lego at home you start to blur the blocky edges and lose the square corners.

Curves and rounded shapes all of a sudden are possible and your eye interprets it as a whole new form.

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Our daughter making friends with the polar bear!

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An infinite knot

Hands are notoriously difficult to draw, I can’t even imagine how many attempts and amendments went into this giant Lego version!

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The integration of technology and humans

The swimmer sculpture was also particularly good.  Lit using a textured gobo projector it mimics the water ripples and, with the model’s reflection in the glass table top, creates a very powerful illusion of swimming.  Lots of people, me included, actually looked under the table and were surprised to see a distinct lack of Lego!

Lego brick swimmer

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Although you weren’t allowed to touch the sculptures (understandably!) there was nothing stopping you from posing with them.

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The resemblance is uncanny!

One of my favourites was the T-Rex skeleton comprising of some 80,000-odd pieces.  Stunning.

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Some clever pieces even needed a particular viewpoint before it became clear what you were looking at.

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The added benefit of attending the exhibition so late in the calendar was that they had added an additional gallery called In Pieces, a wonderfully playful collaboration with Dean West of Lego items hidden in plain sight of some quite brilliant photographic scenes .

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umbrella

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Suspended bricks complete the floating illusion

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CNN said that the exhibition was in the “top ten of must see global exhibitions”, and you can definitely see why.

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One of many tables in the gift shop!

Having just been inspired by approximately 1.5million Lego bricks through the whole show, and a short play in the gift shop, I then headed off to the Lego store to treat myself!

If you ever get the chance to see any of Nathan Sawaya‘s work I highly recommend it!

The Art Of Form

At first glance I thought this was a cool projection mapping scheme on a Ferrari California T, but once I looked into it I realised they actually did it for real, which makes it even cooler!

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The California T is a stunningly beautiful car (in Rosso Corsa please, if you’re offering), and the form and styling was really put through its paces by the artist Fabian Oefner who travelled to Ferrari HQ in Maranello in order to interpret the car “as an art form through his own eyes”.

The concept was fairly simple, once a specific piping sytem had been developed that is.  Inside a 150mph wind tunnel luminescent paints are thrown over the body of the car and blasted with UV spot lights to bring phosphorescent life to the colours.

As the main lights dim and the UV paint glows, the physical lines of the solid car recede and you are left with the overall form and shape created by the paint, a wonderful organic collection of streaking paint.

The result is “an exploration of the essence of the California T”, encapsulating “the pillars of purposeful design and perpetual innovation that are constants in the creation of all of Ferraris”.

No, I’m not entirely sure what all of that means either.  It looks incredible though!

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There is an unseen relationship between an artist, a subject and the canvas. This unspoken alliance and understanding of the subject can only be brought to light when revealed in its proper context.

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It’s the artist, the subject, and the canvas all at once

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For a bit more insight into what went into the project then take a look at the video below.

If that paint job isn’t quite your thing then head over to the Ferrari Configurator to design your own – I’ve just spent a fair bit of time doing exactly that!

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Via Fubiz.


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