Posts Tagged 'lighting'

UVIVF Photography

UVIVF is a bit of a mouthful isn’t it?  Just when you thought acronyms were supposed to make things easier, “ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence” comes along and says otherwise.

But I’m inclined to forgive and forget on this occasion, because UVIVF is quite simply stunningly beautiful.

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Photographer Craig Burrows uses this UVIVF technique which appears to make the flowers glow by using high intensity UV lighting.  UV light has a shorter wavelength than the range of visible light that humans can see, but given the right light source, filters and camera settings you can capture the reflected wavelengths of light as a visible fluoresce from the subject matter.

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These resulting colours have a ghostly, ethereal quality that makes them look like something from a fantasy world, but by using natural flowers their shape is so instantly recognisable you know that they aren’t.

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My favourite is this close up of a dandelion seed head.

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Craig’s next step is to expand the scene and capture entire gardens using this technique, only with much larger light sources (Craig, if you need a lighting assistant just let me know!).

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Be sure to check out more of his work on Flickr.

Via This is Colossal.

 

Le Petit Chef – Bouillabaisse

Something fun for Friday – a combination of 3D animation and motion capture to project onto a dinner table.

As dining environments get more immersive and offer multi-sensory experiences this is definitely something I can see a lot more of.  Great work from Skull Mapping.

Bon appétit!

Light Well

Working in the lighting industry I often see beautifully executed lighting ideas that by day look simple enough, but by night come alive and transform the space.

The Light Well by Studio Lux Nova is no exception.

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Installed in the market square in Lahti, Finland, it brings the best of both aspects by performing during the day as well as at night.  The interactive nature engages people and creates a beautiful and inspiring focal point.

Drawing on the recent historical findings of the market square excavation site that discovered 150 year old water wells, the Light Well project offers a meeting place and a stage for small-scale events for residents and visitors in the heart of the city as part of the wider area’s overall lighting scheme.

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A fantastic urban lighting solution that enhances the human experience as well as the exterior space.

More from Studio Lux Nova on their site here.

Bioluminescent Forest

I’ve seen projection mapping on lots of physical objects and defined surfaces before, but this is the first instance I’ve seen it interacting with nature and the result is really rather beautiful.

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Photographer Tarek Mawad and animator Friedrich van Schoor spent six weeks on location to create the Bioluminescent Forest.  Immersed in nature it gives a glimpse into their imaginations if all elements of the forest had the ability to emit bioluminescent light.

As ever, worth hitting full screen on this one.

The drops of liquid light falling on the toadstools at around 2:15 is one of my favourite effects.

The final video is magical and ethereal mix, a “wonderland of blinking and twinkling organisms” that bring life to the more static areas of the forest.

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It must have taken high levels of patience to deal with the accuracy required, but the result is impressively worthwhile.

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They personified the forest to accentuate the natural beauty by creating luring luminescent plants and glowing magical mushrooms that speaks volumes to any visitor that enters the minds of the artists through viewing “bioluminescent forest”

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Using pretty much just a laptop, a projector and a digital SLR camera “everything you see was created live, without any effects added in post-production”.

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Behind the scenes footage can be seen here.

How Your Face Changes In Different Lighting

As a lighting designer I found this experiment particularly fascinating.

The impact that light can have on a person or a space never ceases to inspire and amaze me.

People are becoming more and more aware of the impact that lighting can have on how buildings and public spaces look and feel.  Combine this with the opportunity for energy savings, understanding the fast-paced developments in solid state technology, lumen outputs, thermal management, and CRI and you can begin to see why using a Lighting Designer is so important.

Via Pixel Bark.

Nightvision – Incredible Architecture

First things first – I’m back!  It has been exactly one month since my last post as I’ve been all sorts of busy (getting married and being away on our minimoon!).  It was also a good excuse to disconnect for a bit and come back refreshed with lots of ideas and enthusiasm for the new posts I have lined up.

To get the ball rolling again we have an absolutely spectacular video from Luke Shepard, Nightvision.

It’s hard to believe that each of these is a still image and not a continuous video clip, the whole thing is stunningly captured as thousands of images all stabilised and edited together.

Nightvision is a celebration of the “brilliance and diversity of architecture found across Europe” and took Luke a full three months to capture all the images.  Spread over 36 cities in 21 countries the video is a nod to “some of the greatest European structures”, showing them off in a “new and unique way”.

The video struck very close to me in particular.  My job as a lighting designer requires spending time researching and sourcing inspiration, particularly looking at architecture and how we can enhance and complement buildings and such through the medium of light once the sun has gone down.  Accentuating different features, illuminating different aspects, and using different colours and colour temperatures of light across each of these elements.

For the full building list and location map check out http://www.lshep.com.

Arcades

As a lighting designer I’m often collecting images and bookmarking articles of inspiration in my work, but when I came across Arcades by Troika it was too good not to share.

Balancing simple principles of physics it took careful experimentation to transform the initial concept image into reality.


As part of the Future Primitives Project for this week’s Biennale Interieur 2012 in Belgium, the deceptively simple installation of bent light archways uses Fresnel lenses to refract the rays of light through a single focal point.

Cleverly, this doesn’t just alter the direction of the beam of light, it bends it hyperbolically to create the mysterious arches.

The installation venue was deliberately chosen as a space with strong brick walls and exposed beams to further enhance the notion of “inscribing one architectural space within another”.  The light forms something almost tangible, must be quite a surreal sensation to walk through it.

Amazing stuff.  More info on the Troika site.


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