Posts Tagged 'stop motion'

Analogue Loaders

Loader icons are a frustrating necessity in the digital world.

Most OS or computer programmes require them in one form or another to let you know that whatever it is you have asked the software to do is actually being done or processed.  But a lot of the time they represent a “digital limbo”, offering little information into the actual progress of the task and often just implying that your computer has crashed.

Borne from the frustration of this, Raphael Vangelis (who admits to spending of his life “swearing at the computer because it’s crashed or isn’t working”) created this incredible animation, capturing well known loader icons and turning them “into something analogue and playful”.

The result is an homage to all the lost time we collectively spend in digital limbo in the hopes of sudden development on our screen.

How many can you recognise?

I got about half of them.  The rest I either didn’t recognise in time, or was simply mesmerised by the detail involved in crafting each one!

Be sure to take a look at some of Raphael’s other work, and of course the making of video for Analogue Loaders (which reveals the answers to what each of the icons where).

I certainly do not have the patience or tenacity involved for such detailed stop motion animation.  Bravo, Raphael!

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A Girl Named Elastika

This has been featured on a few blogs already (packing up and moving house took up most of my time last week), but it is far too creative and brilliant not to share on here.

The stop motion story of a girl named Elastika and her dreams of discovering the world, amazingly animated by Guillaume Blanchet with only rubber bands, a pin board and hundreds of coloured drawing pins.

You can tell Guillaume is a film maker and not just an animator, the out takes and stunt double at the end are a fantastic nod to the film industry, as are the camera view changes of zooming in and out (particularly on the boat at sea circa 1min50s).

I’m already eyeing up our stationery cupboard at work and wondering what I can make!

Donkey Kong Stop Motion

Anyone from the NES era of cartridge games will know the pain of one not working, and even further heartache when the near foolproof “blow the dust out” approach still renders it unusable.

Self-confessed “geek video” creator GuizDP has used this downtime to create a hugely creative stop motion of the very game that frustrates him, the classic Donkey Kong.

The detail is incredible, from the music and sound effects to replicating how to complete each level for maximum points.  Bravo!

I also love the fact that he has created each element out of Perler Beads which, in themselves, probably took up as much of my childhood as Nintendo did!  I can’t even imagine how many thousands of beads each variation of DK and Mario took.  Fantastic stuff.

If you enjoyed that the GuizDP channel is definitely worth subscribing.

Golden Bricks

I’ve featured a couple of Lego-football reconstructions before (here and here), but none quite as fanatical as this one.

Celebrating a career as illustrious and successful  as David Beckham’s, Golden Balls has now been handed further honours with tribute to his most famous career moments immortalised in Lego stop-motion.

From the treble-winning side of Manchester United to being sent off for England and, of course, THAT free-kick for England against Greece, Japanese film makers Mori Pictures have put together a montage of the best (and worst) bits from “Golden Bricks” over the years.

A career that included Manchester United, Real Madrid, LA Galaxy, and the remarkable recent time spent at Paris Saint-Germaine (which, in a first of it’s kind instance, saw Becks donate his entire salary to a local children’s charity), as well as over 100 international appearances for his country.

Who better to immortalise in Lego?

Lego Champions League 2013

We’ve seen some great football recreations over recent years, from the beautiful efforts of Richard Swarbrick to Lego stop motion captures.

Following on nicely from the Champions League Final between Dortmund and Bayern last weekend The Guardian have provided the match highlights wonderfully recreated in Lego.

The champions of Germany, the champions of Europe again

They have got the instant replays spot on, and when paired with the style of pre-match television coverage overlaid with the original commentary the whole thing is impressively accurate!

A Boy And His Atom

I thought that Guinness had a World Record for just about anything, but World’s Smallest Stop-Motion Film is a new one for me!  Introducing A Boy And His Atom by IBM.

Capturing, positioning and shaping atoms to create an original motion picture on the atomic-level is a precise science and entirely novel
Andreas Heinrich, IBM Research

The stop motion was made by a team of IBM’s nanophysicists not only having a bit of fun, but gaining amazing insight into how to move individual (yes, individual!) atoms.

Crucial in the field of atomic memory and data storage, a scanning tunnelling microscope uses a super-sharp needle to carefully select and move molecules of carbon monoxide along a copper surface to extremely precise locations.  Then, in a similar fashion to more traditional stop-motion style capture, the 100-million times magnified image is recorded and then the atoms are moved again to create the next frame.

With the potential to create devices containing unprecedented levels of storage, this is a very exciting step towards the future of computing and “the new frontiers of math and science”.

More information on the science behind IBM’s big data storage here, and you can see how they made the actual tiny film here.

A Short History Of The GIF

The title says it all.  A short history of the GIF (image format), in stop motion.

Creative, colourful, and surprisingly informative!  Well worth the “Staff Pick” over on Vimeo.

Via Explore.


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